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Flashback Friday: NHK Trophy 2018 Edition

I’m still catching up on all the coverage of last weekend’s Grand Prix of Helsinki, but the best moment by far had to be Yuzuru Hanyu’s quad toe-triple axel combination.

I watched it over and over again, marveling at the spring and height on the triple axel. It would have been excellent on a solo triple axel—the fact that it was directly off a quadruple toe loop was nearly unbelievable. It is amazing and inspiring to see a two-time Olympic Gold Medalist continue to push his own boundaries and the sport forward.

So in honor of Hanyu’s awesomeness last weekend, this NHK Trophy Flashback Friday goes back to 2015, when he broke the world record with this sterling performance:

I love the ease and confidence throughout the program. This was the first time anyone topped 300 points in the IJS, and he cleared it by 22 points, beating silver medalist Boyang Jin by 55.97 points.

And then, because sometimes the only person Hanyu needs to outdo his himself, he broke this very record just a few weeks later at that year’s Grand Prix Final.

Happy NHK viewing, figure skating fans!

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Impressions: Skate America 2018

Before Skate Canada kicks off tomorrow, I want to share some wrap up thoughts on Skate America 2018. I already shared my Four Favorites—one element from each discipline—and I’m going to try to keep doing that throughout the season. It’s fun to look beyond the podium and acknowledge great skating! But there was also plenty to talk about among the top challengers at Skate America this weekend:

Coaching Changes
There was high drama with the announcement that Americans Alexa Scimeca Knierim and Chris Knierim split from their coach, Olympic Champion Aljona Savchenko. To me, it was handled really oddly on the NBC Sports Gold broadcast, in a way that stirred the pot. They teased it during the warmup without coming out and saying that they had split, and then confirmed the news mid-program, distracting from the skating. After their performance, Andrea Joyce interviewed the Knierims and asked directly about the split, and Chris handled the answer graciously, crediting all they had learned from Savchenko while acknowledging that they are no longer working together. Lots of theories about the split have been flying around on Twitter, but I think it is important to remember that Savchenko hasn’t even officially announced her retirement, has shows and other performances on her calendar for the year, and has never been an elite-level coach prior to this. The split could be as simple as realizing that coaching them wasn’t possible with her schedule. But either way, I thought the way that NBC chose to reveal the knowledge distracted from the competition.

Rules Changes
There have been a lot of rule changes this season (+5/-5 GOE being the most noticeable), but I thought they were most evident in the ice dance event. I almost felt like I was watching an entirely different discipline, in a good way. The choreographic sliding movement, one foot step sequence, and choreographic step were all great changes in that they have opened the door for more creativity and innovation in these free dances. I loved how the skaters were able to utilize these elements to really emphasize the character of their programs and music.

Momentum Changes
Several of last year’s viral/Olympic favorites had tough outings here: Jimmy Ma (of U.S. Nationals “Turn Down for What” viral YouTube fame), Loena Hendrickx (who’s brother, fellow skater Jorik, got a lot of attention for his nervous viewing of her skating at the Olympics last year, a la gymnast Aly Raisman’s parents), and Alexei Bychenko (who brought the house down in the team event at the Olympics). It just goes to show how difficult it can be to carry momentum into another season. Ma had a rough free skate, while Hendrickx withdrew due to illness. Bychenko looked a little shaky, compared to his assured Olympic performances. I enjoyed watching all of them so much last year, so here’s hoping things look up for them at their next events. Hendrickx and Bychenko are both scheduled for Grand Prix Finland, while Ma does not have a second Grand Prix.

Age Changes
As a newly minted 30-year-old myself, I loved seeing two skaters in their third decade on the podium in the men’s event: Michal Brezina of the Czech Republic (a longtime fave of mine) and Sergei Voronov of Russia. The ladies on my new favorite podcast, Flutzes and Waxels, were calling them “Team Old,” which was cracking me up, but it is great to see skaters have some longevity in this sport. Just as I loved seeing 30-somethings Aljona Savchenko and Meagan Duhamel out there last season, I applaud these two. Respect for Team Old.

It feels like quite the quick turnaround, but is everybody ready for Skate Canada? We’ll see some of the same faces from Skate America this weekend (Hubbell and Donohue, Starr Andrews, to name a few), so I can’t imagine how they must be feeling about this turnaround. Check back here tomorrow for my Skate Canada Flashback Friday post!


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Four Favorites: Skate America 2018

Skate America 2018 is over—the medals have been handed out and Grand Prix Final frontrunners have staked their claim. In skating, it is often about the medals and the final placements, which means that beautiful moments within a program can often go unacknowledged. Here are four of my favorite elements from this weekend’s competition, one from each discipline:

  1. The final lift in Karina Manta and Joseph Johnson’s free dance:

    An innovative and impressive position that fit the character of their Eurythmics free dance, plus a gorgeous and difficult spiral entry. This team from the U.S. finished 10th in their Grand Prix debut here at Skate America, but there is plenty worth celebrating outside the placement, including this excellent lift.
  2. Alaine Chartrand of Canada had a tough short program at this event, and rallied in the free skate, fighting for every jump and element. I loved the sideways sit spin position in her final combination spin:

    I’ve honestly never seen it before—anybody else? It managed to be a difficult and different position, without being aesthetically unappealing, which I feel like can sometimes happen in pursuit of a level four spin. This was a cool moment in her program for me.
  3. Pairs 5th place finishers Minerva Fabienne Hase and Nolan Seegert of Germany won me over with their short program, especially this catch-foot spiral entry and exit in their death spiral:

    I liked how she held her foot throughout the death spiral—and made it look so easy! Great flexibility and strength.
  4. Another 5th place finisher, Matteo Rizzo of Italy in the men’s event, grabbed my attention with the edge quality, smoothness, and speed of his step sequence in the short program:

    The tempo of the music completely changed in the middle of the element, and his movement followed suit.

Would love for people to chime in with comments of their own favorite elements from the competition, especially from those skaters outside the podium!


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Flashback Friday: Skate America 2018 Edition

The 2018 Grand Prix season is upon us! It feels like things are back to normal with Skate America kicking off the Grand Prix series as usual, unlike last year, when it was the final event. During the Grand Prix this year, I’m planning a Flashback Friday series where I will share a memorable performance from years past at each Grand Prix, on the Friday the competition kicks off.

First up: Michelle Kwan at 1999 Skate America. This was Kwan’s first Grand Prix event after starting college full-time at UCLA. And this weekend at Skate America, U.S. and World Champion Nathan Chen will take the ice for his first Grand Prix event since enrolling full-time at Yale University.

This gem of a flashback video not only includes Kwan’s long program, which clinched the gold, but some awesome behind the scenes shots and interview clips about her freshman year. Check it out:

Will Chen fare as well as Kwan did? He had a rough outing at Japan Open a few weeks ago and will be looking for a cleaner skate here. It all kicks off Friday night!


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Olympic Favorites and Worlds Excitement

Photos and reports from practice ice at the 2018 World Championships in Milan, Italy are already streaming across my Instagram and Twitter feeds, and somehow, I haven’t written about the Olympics on here yet. It was a lot of fun to write for Cosmo leading up to and during the Games, and I also did some live tweeting and reporting for Figure Skaters Online. But now I’m back to this space to share some of my favorite moments from the Olympics, and what I’m most looking forward to at Worlds.

Olympic Favorites

  1. The entire pairs event
    I tend to write least about pairs on here, but it actually turned out to be my favorite event to watch this Olympics. The level of skating was just incredible, and the respect and sportsmanship among the top teams was really special to witness. Watching Meagan Duhamel congratulate Aljona Savchenko in that backstage green room area was a memorable moment from two great champions of the sport. NBC commentator and 2006 Olympic ice dance silver medalist Tanith White captured the moment and shared it on Instagram:

Second favorite moment of the night. #sportsmanship #figureskating @meaganduhamel

A post shared by Tanith White (@tanith_white) on

I think this is probably a favorite of most Olympic viewers, but Aljona Savchenko and Bruno Massot’s free skate was just glorious. The choreography was so fluid between elements that it was like watching a merging of pairs and ice dance.


Watching Duhamel and partner Eric Radford nail a throw quad salchow and be so satisfied with their performance, even before they ended up on the podium, was also a great moment, after the struggles they had last season and early this season.

The Knierims of Team USA made me cry during the team short program with their beautiful skate to “Come What May” — their side-by-side triples working, plus her exuberant landing on the throw triple flip, were both emotional, triumphant moments.

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2018 U.S. Nationals Debrief: The Good & The Bad

The good, the bad, the happy, the sad…that’s me singing some Al Green after a crazy 2018 Nationals. Despite all the drama, I’ll stick with skating forever.

Watching the 2018 U.S. Nationals was more of an emotional viewing experience than I bargained for. I needed some time to digest, hence, why this post is coming almost two weeks after the event. I was so excited for the senior events to get started, and then was emotionally exhausted by the time it all wrapped up on Sunday night. Here’s why:

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