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Impressions: 5 Thoughts on Skate Canada 2017

Did anybody stay up to watch the Skate Canada broadcast on NBC Sports from 11:30 pm – 1 am on Sunday night/Monday morning?

No?

Perhaps because it was basically the middle of the night? Sigh.

Here are my five thoughts from Skate Canada 2017, starting with my tv schedule woes:

      1. I know most diehard fans are watching a live stream on IceNetwork, or following along on Twitter with the exceptional live-tweeting of Rocker Skating’s Jackie Wong. But I like catching the NBC broadcast of Grand Prix events on Sunday morning/early afternoon, and most casual skating viewers are going to watch at that time — rather than late at night. It is a bummer that a sport already struggling with the American audience is relegated to such a bad broadcast time. Get it in on Sunday before football starts, and I think you might have more viewers.
      2. Poor Anna Pogorilaya of Russia had another cringe-worthy performance, full of wild, body-crushing falls. It makes me wonder about how solid her technique is, that this keeps happening [it is at least the third time, with the 2017 Worlds long program and the short at 2015 NHK Trophy being two other noteworthy instances]. I’ve taken more than a few horrible, un-graceful falls in my day, but this is too much for someone at her level. The Skating Lesson even suggested that some of it may be dramatics, once she realizes that the program is going downhill. Whatever it is, it is harming her chances of getting one of the three Russian spots for the Olympic team. It’s too bad, because, in the short program at this event, it looked like she came out swinging and ready to make a comeback. She nailed a clean program, and I especially liked the steps into her triple loop:
      3. I am a HUGE fan of Kaitlin Hawayak and Jean-Luc Baker of the U.S. Their “Liebestraum” free dance is stunning, and I was thrilled that they kept the program for this year, after some sub-par outings at the end of last season. I also liked that they chose fun, popular music for the Latin short dance — I haven’t noticed too much current pop music among the top teams this year [except for the French dance team’s FAB short dance, of course]. That said, “Get Busy” by Sean Paul would not have been my choice.

        The lyrics are a little much for a competition program, and then when they slowed down the tempo for the pattern? I liked it even less. Which is hard because I like them so much — how cute was it that she told him “Good job!” so enthusiastically in the kiss and cry? I definitely prefer the free dance with them this year, because it so lyrical and heartfelt. This program, in addition to the iffy song choice, seemed a little bit like a Meryl Davis and Charlie White impression. I suppose if you’re going to imitate anyone, that’s a good choice. But this is what it reminded me of:
      4. Canada’s Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir grabbed another world record, despite a bobble in the free dance (that a lot of people apparently ignored, according to The Skating Protocol Instagram account). They look happy and relaxed, Tessa especially, when they are performing. They are unmatched in the seamless flow of their elements — there is no telegraphing that an element or pattern is coming up. It is all just pure skating. The short dance is fantastic (though I could do without the mouthing of the lyrics. Ashley Wagner did that in her short as well, and it’s just not my favorite when skaters do that. This isn’t Disney on Ice!). I’m not a huge fan of the free dance, only because Virtue and Moir are known for their originality, and “Moulin Rouge!” feels like it has been done so many times before. There was definite improvement since their first competition at Autumn Classic, so maybe I’ll be singing a different tune by the time the Olympics roll around.
      5. Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue are my vote for the U.S. national dance title this year. They are skating with incredible control — which is a good thing, after some really poorly timed mistakes kept them from moving up on the U.S. podium last year and making the World podium. The opening of their free dance is mesmerizing. Not only are they on point in their timing with the music, but they also uses the pauses in the music really effectively. It’s rare to have a pause in music in skating at all. I also think this program feels very genuine, especially compared to Virtue and Moir’s free dance. As a viewer, I tend to gravitate towards music I’m already familiar with, as I’m sure many of us do. So it’s interesting to me that even though I know Virtue and Moir’s music, and have never run across Hubbell and Donohue’s, that’s the one I connect with more. It feels less like a put-on performance and more like pure dancing. See for yourself:


Next up: Cup of China!

P.S. Apologies if the numbers are showing as roman numerals…I intended for regular old numbers, but lost a battle with WordPress code.

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2017 Worlds Predictions: Ladies

Alright, Worlds officially begins tomorrow (yay!) and it’s time to make my last round of predictions: the ladies.

Sentimental:
Gold – Carolina Kostner, Italy
Silver – Ashley Wagner, USA
Bronze – Evgenia Medvedeva, Russia
Bonus: Canadian Kaetlyn Osmond in 4th and American Mariah Bell in the top 8 (to guarantee three Olympic spots for the U.S. women)

My sentimental predictions are really out there, and most likely impossible, I’d say. Carolina is on the comeback trail, and while she has made steady progress, her technical content doesn’t quite measure up to the top ladies yet. But I just love watching her skate, and the fact that she has made a comeback after her controversial ban. I’m all about the skaters here for the love of the game. Like my girl Ashley Wagner, who I would love to repeat as World silver medalist.

I think she has a great shot at the podium (both my sentimental and rational one), because she is such a fierce competitor and wants to prove that last year’s medal wasn’t a fluke. The withdrawal of Satoko Miyahara of Japan also helps, as unfortunate as that may be.

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Image Source: icenetwork.com

Rational:
Gold – Evgenia Medvedeva, Russia
Silver – Anna Pogorilaya, Russia
Bronze – Ashley Wagner, USA

Medvedeva is so ridiculously consistent that I’d be crazy to have her off of either of my podiums. If she doesn’t win this event, it will be because she had to withdraw. She’s only lost once in her senior career, after all, and it wasn’t to anyone in this field (it was to fellow Russian Elena Radionova at the 2015 Rostelecom Cup). Russian teammate Anna Pogorilaya has had such a consistent season that I think she will land on the podium as well.

My bonus sentimental picks for Osmond in 4th and Bell in the top 8 are because those two ladies are some of my personal favorites – I love the spunk and flair in their skating, and will cross fingers that the jumps are reliable in Helsinki. A top 8 finish by Bell and a medal from Wagner would ensure three spots at the Olympics for the American women. Bell and U.S. champion Karen Chen both said in their pre-Worlds teleconferences (you can listen under the Video tab on IceNetwork) that they aren’t thinking about it, and that skating their best should be enough to lock it up for the U.S. I think it’s safe to say that even if those two allegedly aren’t thinking about it, it is at the forefront of every fan and journalist’s mind at this point, on both the ladies’ and men’s side for the U.S. men.

I’ll be crossing my fingers and watching the live streams. Let the fun begin!